BLOTBOOK

Mar 25

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May 14
brb
For a link to my review on 1883 of Asger Carlsons&#8217; most recent publication- Hester; please see here. 
Feb 13

For a link to my review on 1883 of Asger Carlsons’ most recent publication- Hester; please see here. 

Nov 19

Isabelle Wenzell - You Can’t Stop Me Now and Building Images (2011)

Contorted figures in exasperated frustration, pastel palettes and office attire adorn the ramshackle, seemingly makeshift, studio environments that Isabelle Wenzell constructs. Her intensely appealing images evidence extensive forays into the female figure, colour and form. There is a certain lo-fi aesthetic in the series You Cant Stop Me Now and Building Images, that effectively emotes a feeling of nostalgia; playing on prevalent themes of dreams, make-believe and wondering. 

Her subjects’ headless positions place Wenzells images in a somewhat surreal dimension, somewhere between the work of Francesca Woodman and Paul Kooiker. We can acknowledge a concise attention to narrative within her practice that makes the works both compelling and intriguing. Her compositions blend and make strange the relationship between subject and setting. Where the materiality of the ‘canvasses’ within which her models are placed, creates an unusual relationship that acts to heighten the impact of the discussions prompted to be discussed. 

To see more of her highly recommended practice, please see here:

http://www.isabelle-wenzel.com 

Aug 2

Jens Ulrich

With the Olympics in London well under way, take a look at Jens Ulrichs’ work to see an inspiring series of images. Combining sports photography with that of ancient sculpture, Ulrich achieves a beautiful sense of choreography throughout his compositions.

The original images are large in scale (approx 1m wide/tall), thereby achieving a heightened impact with regards to the various moments captured. The combination of imagery incorporating that of stature, further reinforces a sense of drama that firmly arrests the peak moment of performance. 

To see more of the works visit: 

http://www.van-horn.net/artists/jens-ullrich/selected-works.html

Get your submissions in for the next Photocopy Club exhibition. See website for more details: 
http://thephotocopyclub.com/
Aug 1

Get your submissions in for the next Photocopy Club exhibition. See website for more details: 

http://thephotocopyclub.com/

Jul 12

Rinko Kawauchi - Illuminance 

A fan of Kawauchis’ work it is exciting to see that she is one of the four photographers selected for this years Deutsch Borse Photography Prize. (Alongside John Stezaker, Christopher Williams, and Pieter Hugo)

Recognised for her use of soft palette colours and compositional skill, the images published in the photobook Illumination, continue to incite wonder in their audience. Exploring the extraordinary in the mundane, the work is inticing in its ability to evoke a certain sensibility in the viewer; acknowledging a consideration of themes such as memory, dreams and temporality. 

http://www.rinkokawauchi.com

The prize will open 13 July - 9 September 2012 : click here for more details

Jul 12

Daisuke Yokota - Back Yard 

Following in the footsteps of photographers such as Daido Moriyama and Shomei Tomatsu, Yokota encorporates the use of black and white, high contrast images in a discussion of his Tokyo surroundings. However, despite his adoption of this particular aesthetic, his reasons are driven far more by concept than for aesthetic. 

Working on a single image, photographing and re-printing up to ten times, Yokota aims to introduce an element of temporality that commonly seems more achievable within the mediums of film and music. Inspired by the work of Aphex Twin and David Lynch, his experiments attempt to  visualise effects such as delay and reverb. Encouraging audiences to percieve an image as more than just a document, the images recall a passage of time that functions in relation to how we recall a memory. Yokota speaks of his intentions further: 

"When you’re going to sleep, you think about the stuff that happened to you that day, right? You might see some images, but they’re completely distant from what really happened—they’re hazy. You’re trying to recall something, and photography can also recall things in this way." (Read more here)

http://daisukeyokota.net/top/index.html


Jul 12

Harry Crampton - A Black and Folded City

The use of montage and double exposure techniques within the medium of photography are perhaps now considered a common convention for the use of experimentation. Regardless, Harry Cramptons’ work seeks to explore unfamiliar territory with his recent work A Black and Folded City

The ever illusive artist both within his fine art photographic work, and musical ventures, has taken found imagery from markets, boot sales and charity shops and given them a new lease of life within this body of work. The series effectively encapsulates some of the many contradictions and juxtapositions that are inherent factors of our everyday. Where notions of history, space, place and time are portrayed with heightened incongurity to each other.

Crampton references themes of isolation and nostalgia as common sources for inspiration within his practice. Each of the images representing a blurring of present with past; the bleak, dark, orange scenes of todays’ city at night seep over and through images of the past. Engulfing figures, hiding their presence and haunting the scenes of family days out. The lights of todays’ town seem to impress an aesthetic quality of unease on the memories of times gone by, that creates an alluring appeal despite its disorientating, unassuring nature. 

Catch a look at the rest of the series here whilst the link is still active:
http://cargocollective.com/harrycramptonphotography/A-Black-and-Folded-City

Luke Evans &amp; Josh Lake - I am a Camera 
You may already have become a follower of the recent hype surrounding the first year graphic students from Kingston University. Exhibiting in a recent end of year show Pilot, Evans and Lake have explored what the difference between a photograph and photography actually is.
The students swallowed specially designed capsules containing pieces of 35mm film, digested, excreted and then analysed them underneath a microscope to review their findings. Their experiments display an innovatively alternative approach, to the way in which we can explore the creation of imagery.
Jul 9

Luke Evans & Josh Lake - I am a Camera

You may already have become a follower of the recent hype surrounding the first year graphic students from Kingston University. Exhibiting in a recent end of year show Pilot, Evans and Lake have explored what the difference between a photograph and photography actually is.

The students swallowed specially designed capsules containing pieces of 35mm film, digested, excreted and then analysed them underneath a microscope to review their findings. Their experiments display an innovatively alternative approach, to the way in which we can explore the creation of imagery.

Jul 9

Rebecca Pretty - Liminal

Liminal is the most recent of Prettys’ photographic work, (one of this years graduates from the University of Bournemouth). Following on from previous projects, her work continues a re-interpretation of a continuing sense of dystopia. The milky waters that surround her subjects, lends an aesthetic appeal that is at once alluring and mystifying in its nature.

Water presents itself as a common theme throughout the photographers ouevre to date. Here, placed inbetween a position of apparition and disappearance; the ambivalent purpose of the subjects emphasises a contradiction of feelings between that of unease and tranquility. To see more of Rebecca Prettys work, visit:

http://www.rebeccapretty.co.uk

Jul 3

John Crawford - Arial Nudes 

Adopting a different perspective in the creation of his series of nudes; New Zealand photographer John Crawford has taken to the skies. After scouting the best locations from above, Crawford then deploys his model from the helicopter to the site, before rising back up to over 600ft where the image is then documented. 

This playful yet highly orchastrated series lends a light hearted atmosphere to this particular genre of photography. The fact that those at ground level whilst these images are being captured will more than likely be oblivious to their content, creates an amusing and slightly secretive nature to the series. 

To see more of the series and of John Crawfords work visit: 

http://johncrawford.co.nz

Jul 2

Carlo Van de Roer - The Portrait Machine

I recently discovered, or looked further into the possibilities of electromagnetic, or more commonly - Aura photographic devices. Surrounded in skeptisism as to the actual findings, I find this form of photography fascinating. Luckily chancing upon the work of Carlo Van de Roer and his project ‘Portrait Machine.’

The work encompasses portraits of those familiar to the artist, or characters with whom it was felt the audience could relate to. The camera acts to visually represent what a pyschic may see. Exploring and attempting to develop the extents of insight that a photographic image can be considered to portray. de Roer has created a camera that monitors electromagnetic feedback, sensors connected to the subject detect signals which are then converted into information that is depicted in colour on the photographic print; it is also described in a camera-generated diagram and description. (As can be seen in the first example of Miranda)

The work is set to be published. Until then you can look through more information and images here: 

http://www.theportraitmachine.com

You can also pre-order the book at Kickstarter.  

Mar 29

Caroline Molloy- Remnants of a Visual History (2008-2011) 

http://www.molloyportfolio.com

Mar 29

Xing Danwen- Urban Fictions (2004)

Drawing upon themes of ‘urban monotony’, artist Xing Danwen has produced a series of large scale photographs to question the seemingly idilyic urban landscape. 

Looking at her work I instantly want to draw comparisons to the technical processes of Thomas Demand, and artists working with image databases such as google maps, seen in the work of Mishka Henner and Jon Rafman. Danwen has reconstructed model landscapes from digital prints of her suroundings. This contradiction and juxtaposition of scale from down-sizing in photograph and model, to up-scaleing in the final photographic print- heightens a sense of unease and surreality to the body of work. 

Amongst the huge architecture, we see small scenes of ‘everyday life.’ Ranging from the mundane, like smoking a cigarette, riding a bike, to the not so everyday knife murder; these images prompt us to question our surroundings and our position within them.

The figures, modelesque in aesthetic, invite us to relate to them in their activities in some sense or another. (Although perhaps acting the murderer is a less empathic role for us to relate to.)

As a result, the work acts to represent the stifiling, constructed nature of the urban landscape. Placing us as figurines in a ‘concrete maze’ where ‘everyday life’ is part of a game we enact. 

To see more of Xing Danwens work, please see the following link: 

http://www.danwen.com/web/